Diagnostics of pregnancy

Instructor: Amanda Smith

Department/School/College: Biomedical Sciences, College of Health Sciences

 

Intervention Overview
This intervention engaged students and reduced the perceived disconnect between the online content and face to face sessions in a blended course. Students were required to post their “muddiest points” from the assigned content. This discussion activity required students to identify a concept that was challenging for them. With this information I could customize the delivery of course concepts for that particular cohort. This allowed me to connect the online materials and our face to face session, while still covering the necessary course material.

Title: BMS 312: Abdominal Sonography II

Level: Undergraduate

Mode: Blended

Session type: 16-week semester

Enrollment: 6 students

The pedagogical problem I set out to solve was to better engage the students and reduce the perceived disconnect between the online content and face to face sessions in a blended course. Past feedback, course evaluations and informal discussions, from students has indicated that they struggle to identifying “what they know” and “what they do not know” when the course is not taught as a traditional face to face lecture.

The intention for the Mud-Pit discussion assignment required students to post their “muddiest” points from the online content. These points were meant to be items that a student found confusing, challenging, or were unsure of. I then used the posts to tailor our face to face sessions. By incorporating the student’s post into the face to face sessions, it created more meaningful class time where I was able to address the areas specific to the students’ needs. With this information I could create a customized delivery of the concepts that were more challenging for that particular cohort, show the connection between the online materials and our face to face session, and still cover the necessary course material.

Pre-Intervention

 

During the Intervention

 

Post-Intervention

 

Method

 

Results

Student feedback was gathered at mid-term through use of an electronic survey. Students were notified of the anonymous survey and its purpose through email and in person. Participation in the survey was not required and did not have any impact on the student’s grade for the course. The survey consisted of eleven questions. Six students participated for a 100% participation rate.